“There are two basic approaches to handling hazardous drug spills. Either train the entire staff to handle these incidents or establish a spill response team.”

Joseph Coyne, RPh

While protective mechanisms help reduce the risk of accidental hazardous drug exposure, spills may still occur. USP <800> has specific requirements that must be followed.

Managing an HD Spill.

Spill control:

All personnel who might be required to clean up a spill of HDs must receive proper training in spill management and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and NIOSH-certified respirators. Spills must be contained and cleaned immediately, only by qualified personnel with appropriate PPE.

Waste disposal:

All personnel who perform routine custodial waste removal and cleaning activities in HD handling areas must be trained in appropriate procedures to protect themselves and the environment from HD contamination. Disposal of all HD waste, including but not limited to unused HDs and trace-contaminated PPE and other materials, must comply with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations.

Deactivation or decontamination, cleaning, and disinfecting:

All personnel who perform deactivation, decontamination, cleaning, and disinfection activities in HD handling areas must be trained in appropriate procedures to protect themselves and the environment from contamination. All personnel performing these activities must don appropriate PPE resistant to the cleaning agents used, including two pairs of chemotherapy gloves and impermeable disposable gowns. Additionally, eye protection and face shields must be used if splashing is likely. If warranted by the activity, respiratory protection must be used.

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